Slavery in Australia & the Asia Pacific

“In the Asia Pacific Region, Australia represents one of the biggest destination hubs for trafficking. Individuals from Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, South Korea, China, several Pacific Islands…migrate or are trafficked into Australia for a variety of employment sectors.”
– TIP Report

There are over 30 million slaves in the world today, more than at any other point in history. Human trafficking is the fastest-growing criminal industry worldwide and generates more than $32 billion per year. Today, children and adults around the globe are enslaved in sex trafficking, forced labor, debt bondage and military servitude. The United Nations reports that 56% of all victims of human trafficking are from the Asia Pacific Region. Within this region, the trade in human property has manifested to involve the exploitation of women, men, girls and boys, in a wide range of industries and settings.

In the Asia Pacific, Australia represents one of the biggest destination hubs for trafficking. Individuals from Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, South Korea, China, several Pacific Islands and, to a lesser extent, India, Vietnam, Eastern Europe, and Africa, migrate or are trafficked into Australia for a variety of employment sectors. Subsequent to their arrival, however, some of these individuals (namely women) are coerced into prostitution in both legal and illegal brothels. Oftentimes men are placed in more labour intensive situations, such as restaurant work, construction sites or agricultural fields.

To understand the phenomenon of modern slavery, and to formulate a sustainable and replicable response, it is fundamental to view this egregious crime as an international economic crisis. It is from this vantage point that Not For Sale has developed it’s models and methodologies of prevention, restoration and support of survivors.

In the Australian context, many cases of slavery and human trafficking are often not identified and therefore not reported, so the true extent of the problem is not fully known. An increase in public awareness, and a cross-sector response, including government agencies, NGO’s, universities and advocacy groups is helping to more clearly identify the problem in Australia.